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Guide To Shooting On Public Lands In Arizona

Many people enjoy target shooting and plinking in open country. When participating in this activity shooters must be aware of federal and state gun laws. We would like to provide you with some information that will give you a better understanding of regulations and guidelines relating to shooting on public lands.

Where Can I Shoot?

You can target shoot on federal public lands that are not developed as a recreation site/area, which have not been administratively closed to target shooting, and where target shooting is not prohibited by other state law or statute. ( An example of a prohibited act is shooting on public lands across a highway.) While hunting with a license and in season is allowed on Arizona State Trust Land recreational shooting is prohibited. If you are in doubt that an area is open to recreational shooting contact the appropriate agency before discharging your firearm.

When Shooting

Select a safe location for your target practice. Know your target and what is beyond!. A spot with a hill, canyon walk or a large mound directly behind the target is ideal. Avoid popular recreation areas and sensitive wildlife habitats. Never shoot in a direction where there are people, domestic animals or structures. Always keep your firearms muzzle pointed in a safe direction.

Use paper targets mounted on wooden stakes. Do not attach targets to living plants or place targets up against rocks or solid objects, which can cause ricochets. Please do not shoot at glass bottles or other refuse. Broken glass can be hazardous to people and wildlife. Always pick up and remove targets and empty shells when you are finished.

To help ensure you shoot legally remember:

NEVER shoot from, on or across a road.

NEVER shoot whereby any person or property may be exposed to injury of damage.

NEVER damage any natural feature or other property.

NEVER shoot from a vehicle, parked or moving.

NEVER shoot if unsure of your backdrop and what is beyond.

NEVER act in an aggressive or threatening manner to other public land users.

 

 

 

A word to the wise 

The information contained in this guide is for general information purposes only. It is not a substitute for the law and is not intended to be inclusive of all laws and regulations. You are fully accountable for knowing the laws and regulations when you deal with firearms in under any circumstances.

Snake Bites

 

 Highlights

  • If you see a snake in your home, immediately call the animal control agency in your county.

  • Be aware of snakes that may be swimming in the water or hiding under debris or other objects.

  • If you or someone you know are bitten, try to see and remember the color and shape of the snake.

  • Do not pick up a snake or try to trap it.

After a natural disaster, snakes may have been forced from their natural habitats and move into areas where they would not normally be seen or expected. When you return to your home, be cautious of snakes that may have sought shelter in your home. If you see a snake in your home, immediately call the animal control agency in your county.

How to Prevent Snake Bites

  • Be aware of snakes that may be swimming in the water to get to higher ground and those that may be hiding under debris or other objects.

  • If you see a snake, back away from it slowly and do not touch it.

Signs of Snake Bites

If you have to walk in high water, you may feel a bite, but not know that you were bitten by a snake. You may think it is another kind of bite or scratch. Pay attention to the following snake bite signs.

Depending on the type of snake, the signs and symptoms may include:

  • A pair of puncture marks at the wound

  • Redness and swelling around the bite

  • Severe pain at the site of the bite

  • Nausea and vomiting

  • Labored breathing (in extreme cases, breathing may stop altogether)

  • Disturbed vision

  • Increased salivation and sweating

  • Numbness or tingling around your face and/or limbs

What TO DO if You or Someone Else is Bitten by a Snake

  • If you or someone you know are bitten, try to see and remember the color and shape of the snake, which can help with treatment of the snake bite.

  • Keep the bitten person still and calm. This can slow down the spread of venom if the snake is venomous.

  • Seek medical attention as soon as possible.

  • Dial 911 or call local Emergency Medical Services (EMS).

  • Apply first aid if you cannot get the person to the hospital right away.

    • Lay or sit the person down with the bite below the level of the heart.

    • Tell him/her to stay calm and still.

    • Wash the wound with warm soapy water immediately.

    • Cover the bite with a clean, dry dressing.

What NOT TO DO if You or Someone Else is Bitten by a Snake

  • Do not pick up the snake or try to trap it (this may put you or someone else at risk for a bite).

  • Do not apply a tourniquet.

  • Do not slash the wound with a knife.

  • Do not suck out the venom.

  • Do not apply ice or immerse the wound in water.

  • Do not drink alcohol as a pain killer.

  • Do not drink caffeinated beverages. 

© 2016 Gold Prospectors Association of Phoenix (GPAP)

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